Drouth Weekly

7th June 2020

On Peoples’ Palaces
by Hailey Maxwell

Having quietly endured almost twenty years of managed decline, writes Hailey Maxwell, it is crucial that we consider the possibility that the Peoples’ Palace on Glasgow Green – a valuable civic asset and monument to Scottish history and working-class life may presently be at real risk of being neutralised, misappropriated and entirely co-opted into a neoliberal agenda. Spaces and places which were once public are being repurposed and reimagined not for the benefit of the citizen but for the property developer, the multi-national corporation and the tourist.
 

Latest Review

31st May 2020

A Song From Under the Floorboards:
Susan Phillipsz’ Muffled Drums
by Neil Cooper

A new work commissioned from artist Susan Phillipsz was set to open at The Woodland's historic Hamilton Mansion. As the pandemic made the presentation impossible, the artist remade the work as a series of files that can be downloaded for lockdown , Neil Cooper describes the experience.

The Drouth Review


20th April 2020

from Covid Conversations by Johnny Rodger

'I was born again but this time I knew it meant I was dead.'
19th July 2019

ENGLAND, YOUR ENGLAND’ GEORGE ORWELL A​ND BREXIT

The comparison of the British status in the EU to one of slaves was a vile insult, mean, low and just wrong. But all the bleating and booing will avail […]
12th September 2015

The anti-Imperialist’s Guide to Inaction in Syria By Muhammad Idrees Ahmad

The Arab revolutions that started in the winter of 2010 have wreaked havoc with political certainties. At the “Festival of Dangerous Ideas” last year, the British-Pakistani intellectual Tariq Ali lamented […]
14th February 2020

1917 AND ALL THAT
by Owen Dudley Edwards

Hailed as a significant technical achievement, Owen Dudley Edwards sees the film 1917 as a great humanising agent.
4th December 2019

Take the High Road: Scott Hames’ Literary Politics of Scottish Devolution by Colin Kidd

Colin Kidd muses on relations (if any) between the near unanimity of the literary world and the actually existing historical world in his review of Scott Hames’s new book The Literary Politics […]
26th March 2020

Undertow by Frances Scott

If photography is the temporal art of the gaze, what is its condition at the edge, or the limit of space? What bonds, what risk of naming can secure it from being drawn off in the 'undertow'? Frances Scott walks the native territory.