TheDrouth

14th February 2020

1917 AND ALL THAT by Owen Dudley Edwards

Hailed as a significant technical achievement, Owen Dudley Edwards sees the film 1917 as a great humanising agent.
6th February 2020

Beethoven 250 by Iain Matheson

It’s a quarter millennium this year since the birth of THE Romantic hero, the Thunderer himself, Beethoven, who claimed to have taken ‘fate by the throat’ and would never ‘let it bend me completely to its will’. Iain Matheson picks his way through Beethoven’s will and his work.
31st January 2020

Does the estate have its own will? Dwelling upon the last will.
by Agnieszka Kilian

In a world proliferating in riches and injustice there seems, for the moment anyhow, little relief in the notion of generations. For Nietzsche the contract was a ‘memory of the will’, but there are other modes of control of future distribution of goods. The question here, for Agnieszka Kilian, with the last will, is who or what bequeaths, and what actually is the bequest?
31st January 2020

Jonas Staal’s Propaganda Art in the 21st Century
by Hailey Maxwell

Where would propaganda stand in the ‘early days of a better nation’ while the world is contemporaneously beset by the War on Terror, Fake News and other effects of the will of Trump and of Bannon and their likes on the contemporary political landscape? Hailey Maxwell looks through Jonas Staal’s work to open up some horizons.
28th January 2020

Jolanta Dolewska

Jolanta Dolewska lives and works in Glasgow and works predominantly with photography. Her artistic practice is driven by concerns about the power struggle of human beings in relation to their physical and political existence...
19th December 2019

Back to the Individual Experience: Rethinking Chinese Art, Overturning EuroCentrism by Carol Yinghua Lu

A pivotal figure in the intellectual and critical examination of Chinese Art, Carol Yinghua Lu writes about her research which reveals the complex sources, influences traditions and narratives which look […]
13th December 2019

Tales of two cities: Coventry Biennial 2019 By Jamie Limond

The Coventry Biennial describes itself as the UK’s ‘social biennial’. More than any other biennale, the Coventry questions how the festival engages with the local community, and what relationship there […]
13th December 2019

Federalism – A Drouth Enquiry by Owen Dudley Edwards

It seems appropriate to publish a long meditation on the nature and history of federalism on the day of a British election where Brexit is the pressing issue and the […]
4th December 2019

Take the High Road: Scott Hames’ Literary Politics of Scottish Devolution by Colin Kidd

Colin Kidd muses on relations (if any) between the near unanimity of the literary world and the actually existing historical world in his review of Scott Hames’s new book The Literary Politics […]