Review

5th March 2020

Falling asleep at the Movies: Long Day’s Journey Into Night
by Jamie Limond

Bi Gan’s Long Day’s Journey Into Night, a massive 2018 box office success in China which confused the hell out of the date-night audience it was marketed towards, has finally limped its way over to a UK distracted by Parasite. Long Day’s mixes art house boredom with trashy noir tropes and 3D, single-take gimmickry, un-bottling a whole jumble of questions about how and why we watch long, ponderous movies when we could be watching something else.
27th February 2020

Parallel State: Lines of sight beyond the territory
by Simon Poulter

Until one month ago, British people were among the few lucky individuals on this planet that could count themselves to not only one, but even two citizenships. Facing a deterioration of the positive powers that are granted to UK-citizens, it begs the question of who has really benefitted from taking away these ‘bonus rights’. Would it be possible to reinstate this safety-net by connecting mobile and transitory points of resistance to connect to a new form of citizen-power? Meet the emerging Parallel State. Simon Poulter gives a recap of the day on which the ambitions of the Parallel State were drawn out and reviews the territory it was inescapably born into.
14th February 2020

1917 AND ALL THAT
by Owen Dudley Edwards

Hailed as a significant technical achievement, Owen Dudley Edwards sees the film 1917 as a great humanising agent.
31st January 2020

Jonas Staal’s Propaganda Art in the 21st Century
by Hailey Maxwell

Where would propaganda stand in the ‘early days of a better nation’ while the world is contemporaneously beset by the War on Terror, Fake News and other effects of the will of Trump and of Bannon and their likes on the contemporary political landscape? Hailey Maxwell looks through Jonas Staal’s work to open up some horizons.
19th December 2019

As Radical as Reality?: Werner Herzog’s ‘Meeting Gorbachev’

Based on three in-depth conversations with the former President of the Soviet Union, Meeting Gorbachev (2019) is the latest documentary from Werner Herzog. How does ‘ecstatic truth’ fare when contending […]
13th December 2019

Tales of two cities: Coventry Biennial 2019 By Jamie Limond

The Coventry Biennial describes itself as the UK’s ‘social biennial’. More than any other biennale, the Coventry questions how the festival engages with the local community, and what relationship there […]
4th December 2019

Alan Dimmick: From the Archive by Catherine Owen

Pascal Gielen once defined art ‘scenes’ as ‘the new factories in the economy of ideas’. The Glasgow art scene however, does sometimes seem more like an old stable for conjuring […]
27th November 2019

Merely conventional signs. ‘Dreams&Dramas. Law as Literature’ by Katarzyna Maniak

Dreams and Dramas :Law as Literature is the book to accompany the 2017 exhibition published by NGBK edited by Agnieszka Kilian in collaboration with Joerg Franzbecker and Jaro Varga. It examines […]
21st November 2019

The Drouth was at TRAINING FOR THE FUTURE

What is a 'Training Camp' organised for and by artists and activists? What would ‘Training for the Future’ mean at an International Arts and Music Festival? The Drouth was at ‘Training for the Future’ at the Ruhr Triennale.