Drouth Weekly

22nd April 2022

POSTING MAY DAY:
The story of International Workers’ Day through Trade Union Posters
by LORNA MILLER

The Story of May Day as the celebration of International Workers Day, and specifically the organisation of the Glasgow May Day festivities over the last few years, is told by artist and political cartoonist Lorna Miller in a wonderful insight into her work in creation of posters for Glasgow Trades Council.
13th April 2022

BoJo – Falstaff – Bunter:
or A Greater Englishness?
by Owen Dudley Edwards

Bunteresque? Falstaffian? BoJo-vian? England always gets the best. Owen Dudley Edwards on the rich history of greedy liars in English political and cultural life - Enlisting the critique of George Orwell, PG Wodehouse and fellow Irishman George Bernard Shaw along the way.

The Drouth Review

19th March 2022

TOMOKO KONOIKE
Storytelling Table Runner
by Naoko Mabon

Japanese Artist Tomoko Konoike brought her wonderful dialogic textile art to an event co-organised by The Drouth for Glasgow International last year. Curator Naoko Mabon first published this text on Konoike in the online version of the Japan Quality magazine (Tokyo: Fudosha Co.Ltd.) in February 2022.
21st January 2022

US OR THEM:
Kelman’s ‘The State is Your Enemy’
Reviewed by Federica Giardino

Three new books by James Kelman have just been published by PM Press of California. This must be an exciting time for both Kelman fans and for Kelman Studies. One new novel, one collection of essays, and and a philosophical debate between Kelman and Noam Chomsky -it's a lot to chew on. So The Drouth is delighted to be producing the first reviews of these new works. The final piece in our Kelman series is a review of his new collection of essays by researcher and writer Federica Giardino.
14th January 2022

‘GOD’S TEETH…’
James Kelman’s new novel
reviewed by Gerry Hassan

Three new books by James Kelman have just been published by PM Press of California. This must be an exciting time for both Kelman fans and for Kelman Studies. One new novel, one collection of essays, and and a philosophical debate between Kelman and Noam Chomsky -it's a lot to chew on. So The Drouth is delighted to be producing the first reviews of these new works. The second up in our Kelman series is a review of his new novel by writer Gerry Hassan.
5th January 2022

KELMAN & CHOMSKY Reviewed by Carole Jones

Three new books by James Kelman have just been published by PM Press of California. This must be an exciting time for both Kelman fans and for Kelman Studies. One new novel, one collection of essays, and and a philosophical debate between Kelman and Noam Chomsky -it's a lot to chew on. So The Drouth is delighted to be producing the first reviews of these new works. First up is literary critic and scholar Carole Jones with her reading of the decades long engagement between Kelman and Chomsky mapped out through this published collection of essays, interviews and correspondence between the two writers.
26th October 2021

Underneath the Arches :
building the foundations to fail better
by Neil Cooper

The loss of The Arches as a site for the eruption of anarchic creative collaborations of a generation through all forms imaginable was a shock. Did the forces of conservatism conspire to finish it off in 2015... or maybe its work was done there, and the spirit needed to move on anyway? Neil Cooper's review of Innes and Bratchpiece's history of the venue is epic and elegaic: it deserves all that and even more ...
30th September 2021

THOMAS JOSHUA COOPER :
‘The World’s Edge …’
by Dana Macfarlane

The Scotto-American photographer Thomas Joshua Cooper is a titan in his field. Dana Macfarlane reviews his new show, ‘The World’s Edge – The Atlas of Emptiness and Extremity’, at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery and discusses the tensions in the work which is 'unsettling' and 'subtly uncanny'.
1st August 2021

RAW & GREEN? :
Barnabas Calder on Architecture and Energy
by Florian Urban

Form follows Fuel -or is it, Form follows Food? -Or both? In advance of COP26 -and our own specially timed 'Climate' issue in November, Florian Urban assesses Barnabas Calder's new book. Its exposé of Architecture - and especially the production of its materials, steel and cement - as the worst of climate-change culprits is interesting, to say the least, in the light of Calder's published panegyrics on Brutalism...
5th July 2021

SUGAR AND SOOT & ALL THINGS MOOT :
Denise Ferreira da Silva & Arjuna Neuman @ CCA
by Johnny Rodger

Can climate change be discussed in isolation from racism? From slavery? Can it be discussed in isolation from anything? Johnny Rodger reviews the art work/film by Ferreira da Silva and Neuman commissioned for the Glasgow International Festival.
2nd June 2021

Mining the Moral Economy:
Ewan Gibbs on Coal and Deindustrialisation
by Johnny Rodger

Ewan Gibbs' book 'Coal Country' claims to be the first full length study of deindustrialisation in the Scottish coalfields. But its scope is actually much broader and much more ambitious in its treatment of an age of massive social upheaval. Johnny Rodger reviews and appreciates that ambition.
19th May 2021

Neighbouring in Deep Time:
Ilana Halperin in Yamaguchi
by Naoko Mabon

In advance of our own Neighbouring project (15-18 June @ GI), one of our Scottish Japanese collaborators, Naoko Mabon, writes here of the work of Scottish artist Ilana Halperin in Japan. Halperin's mineral investigations open us up to the urgency of our understanding of and identity with the geological in the age of Anthropocene.
9th May 2021

Locating Practice / Locating Legacy :
Nicky Bird at Streetlevel
by Eszter Biró

Photographer Nicky Bird's engagement with memory, community, place and legacy is put in artistic and intellectual context by Eszter Biró in a review of Bird's new show at Streetlevel Gallery (until 6th June).
3rd March 2021

Between Atmosphere and Airlessness:
Daisy Lafarge’s ‘Life without Air’
Rochelle Roberts

In both Daisy Lafarge's poetry and prose -see her 'Metaphor as Parasite' in our Hollow issue - consciousness seems to float seamlessly in a fermentation of biology and minerology. Rochelle Roberts reviews her latest poetry collection here and finds it 'full of, and without air'.