Scottish Politics

3rd June 2022

GLASGOW COOL OF ART:
13 books of fire at the Mackintosh Library
by Johnny Rodger
reviewed by MURDO MACDONALD

A new book 'Glasgow Cool of Art: 13 books of fire at the Mackintosh Library' takes a personal, artistic, intellectual and critical view of the two fires in Mackintosh's masterwork. It attempts to square the trauma that the fires caused by looking at the effect on a wide range of people -adults, children, citizens, academics, artists, architects, and as Murdo Macdonald notes in review, addresses the challenge of the international worth or otherwise of that great building.
22nd April 2022

POSTING MAY DAY:
The story of International Workers’ Day through Trade Union Posters
by LORNA MILLER

The Story of May Day as the celebration of International Workers Day, and specifically the organisation of the Glasgow May Day festivities over the last few years, is told by artist and political cartoonist Lorna Miller in a wonderful insight into her work in creation of posters for Glasgow Trades Council.
21st January 2022

US OR THEM:
Kelman’s ‘The State is Your Enemy’
Reviewed by Federica Giardino

Three new books by James Kelman have just been published by PM Press of California. This must be an exciting time for both Kelman fans and for Kelman Studies. One new novel, one collection of essays, and and a philosophical debate between Kelman and Noam Chomsky -it's a lot to chew on. So The Drouth is delighted to be producing the first reviews of these new works. The final piece in our Kelman series is a review of his new collection of essays by researcher and writer Federica Giardino.
20th January 2022

THE ‘NOT PROVEN’ VERDICT
An open letter to Keith Brown, Justice Secretary
by Owen Dudley Edwards

Last month the Cabinet Secretary for Justice, Keith Brown MSP, launched a three-month long consultation on the Not Proven verdict (and other aspects of the Criminal Justice System) and invited responses from the public. The Justice Secretary acknowledged that there are some 'strong opinions' on the verdict. We publish here an open letter the Justice Secretary, written by the Irish historian and writer Owen Dudley Edwards, giving his opinion on the verdict.
6th November 2021

Glasgow, Clydeside’s Carbon Capital
by Ewan Gibbs

Was the Second City of Empire the First City of the carbon economy? Ewan Gibbs takes a tour through history and across civic space to show us the special sites of interest in 'Glasgow's role in the making of a fossil burning world'
3rd November 2021

‘Survival Tools of the Anthropocene’: Islandness and Resilience in Saoirse Higgins’ Pap-ØY-cene
by Antonia Thomas

How is the Anthropocene at sea/local level? And how can climate change be be felt, and dealt with through the time worn understandings and handlings of material in the oceanic zones? Reviewing Saoirse Higgins' show PapØycene at the Pier in Stromness, Antonia Thomas suggests that art and artists can open us to new perspectives - and that Higgins, in particular, sets a 'benchmark' here.
29th October 2021

Looking for Scottish Modern
by Dominic Hinde

Are some places more obviously adaptable and amenable to new environmental measures and regimes, and what are the economics and politics of some of the new necessities? Guest Editor for our Climate theme, Dominic Hinde, surfs the local modern to sample the global drift.
2nd June 2021

Mining the Moral Economy:
Ewan Gibbs on Coal and Deindustrialisation
by Johnny Rodger

Ewan Gibbs' book 'Coal Country' claims to be the first full length study of deindustrialisation in the Scottish coalfields. But its scope is actually much broader and much more ambitious in its treatment of an age of massive social upheaval. Johnny Rodger reviews and appreciates that ambition.
2nd June 2021

Election 2021 and its Legacy
by Owen Dudley Edwards

The analysis of the political landscape of Scotland post-election 2021 that it's been worth waiting for. Owen Dudley Edwards looks at the results and the likely legacies, and puts them in the context of such a deep time and broad space as you won't be able to read elsewhere. It's a reading which is considered and generous in its appreciations, even if forthright in its partisanship.