Drouth Weekly

CLIMATE - Issue 71. November - December 2021

 
It is with great pleasure that I introduce this special edition of The Drouth for the Glasgow COP. When The Drouth was founded in 2001 climate change was a relatively minor worry for governments and scientists. It was widely assumed that by the time we reached the 2020s it would have been dealt with in the spirit of liberal enlightenment and technological adjustment. In the time since it has become clear just how wicked of a problem climate change is, and how it has come to define our lives and will continue to do so for a century at least. The totality of climate change also means that the responses to it must come from all quarters, and here we are very happy to have contributions from the fields of photography, landscape art, architecture, journalism, and history in keeping with the best spirit of The Drouth. Dominic Hinde, Guest Editor
 
6th November 2021

Glasgow, Clydeside’s Carbon Capital
by Ewan Gibbs

Was the Second City of Empire the First City of the carbon economy? Ewan Gibbs takes a tour through history and across civic space to show us the special sites of interest in 'Glasgow's role in the making of a fossil burning world'
3rd November 2021

‘Survival Tools of the Anthropocene’: Islandness and Resilience in Saoirse Higgins’ Pap-ØY-cene
by Antonia Thomas

How is the Anthropocene at sea/local level? And how can climate change be be felt, and dealt with through the time worn understandings and handlings of material in the oceanic zones? Reviewing Saoirse Higgins' show PapØycene at the Pier in Stromness, Antonia Thomas suggests that art and artists can open us to new perspectives - and that Higgins, in particular, sets a 'benchmark' here.
29th October 2021

No Abstract Notion: Survival
by Sophie Gerrard

The beautiful photographic documentation of 'environmental stories' by Sophie Gerrard allows us to pose questions about damage and care and recovery and the relationships between them.
29th October 2021

Looking for Scottish Modern
by Dominic Hinde

Are some places more obviously adaptable and amenable to new environmental measures and regimes, and what are the economics and politics of some of the new necessities? Guest Editor for our Climate theme, Dominic Hinde, surfs the local modern to sample the global drift.

RECOVER - Issue 70. September - October 2021

 
What is the condition of our being and our knowing of it, when we recover? Can we ever get back to that original, that wonted position? What do we get back, and would we even want to get back?
 
26th October 2021

Underneath the Arches :
building the foundations to fail better
by Neil Cooper

The loss of The Arches as a site for the eruption of anarchic creative collaborations of a generation through all forms imaginable was a shock. Did the forces of conservatism conspire to finish it off in 2015... or maybe its work was done there, and the spirit needed to move on anyway? Neil Cooper's review of Innes and Bratchpiece's history of the venue is epic and elegaic: it deserves all that and even more ...
22nd October 2021

Why Afghanistan?
by
Owen Dudley Edwards

The absurdities of the American War in Afghanistan -backed by their allies- are exposed here by Owen Dudley Edwards. As another view of the tragedy it is heartbreaking in its farcical detail, and recounts a sorry tale which, despite withdrawal of US and allied troops, is far from over for the people of the region.
10th October 2021

A Requiem for Afghan Dreams
by
Muhammad Idrees Ahmad

Bombarded with multiple narratives on the ongoing tragedy of Afghanistan it's easy to see why many people might shrug and turn away leaving it as a dangerous and desperate void of suffering... 'The US have learnt nothing' writes Muhammad Idrees Ahmad, and does the world a huge service by getting to the heart of the complex Afghan matter with concision, clear-sightedness and neutrality
30th September 2021

THOMAS JOSHUA COOPER :
‘The World’s Edge …’
by Dana Macfarlane

The Scotto-American photographer Thomas Joshua Cooper is a titan in his field. Dana Macfarlane reviews his new show, ‘The World’s Edge – The Atlas of Emptiness and Extremity’, at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery and discusses the tensions in the work which is 'unsettling' and 'subtly uncanny'.
11th September 2021

RECOVER – SARAJEVO 25 Years On by Chris Leslie

Chris Leslie has spent 25 years documenting Sarajevo. He has followed the changes in that city through the post war period and engaged on many levels with the legacy of conflict. His latest work asks how the city stages its recovery and how we can know it as that city in recovery. What shapes our approaches to it now, and what does it tell us?

FIGURE - Issue 69. July - August 2021

 
If matter is only potential until it is given or takes form then how should we understand ‘figure’? Is it a calculation of the thing without the presence of its actual body? Go figure.
 
24th July 2021

METAPHORIC
by Raymond Burke

Too big to big up any further as a classroom poster or a one man stage show, Raymond Burke has finally compiled and published the book of the Metaphoric Table with The Drouth. -Can you not refuckingmember what Tmesis is? Do you go red red in the face when faced with Epizeuxis, or is it Anthimeria? -then this is the book to figure it out for you ...
17th July 2021

More than one way to wash a heart…
by Sara O’Brien

Is translation a mere figure? - A type of metaphor where new sets of words or phrases are applied to an object or an action? Is it indeed a ritualistic figure in its transporting of meaning to another shore? Sara O'Brien explores translation as the hosting of the other, and the arrival of the guest from beyond to the new shore.
12th July 2021

GRAVITY
by Barbara Melville- Jóhannesson

'Gravity ... the universal force of attraction acting between all matter’ - The entire world is pulling on us. How does it feel to be in a world of chronic illness?
12th July 2021

Internet Frontier: What’s the Story? by Calum Barnes

Writing has proliferated since the advent of social media. Everyone is at it. What is the status of such writing, asks Calum Barnes, how do 'writers' view such writing and what we are doing when we are writing it?
5th July 2021

SUGAR AND SOOT & ALL THINGS MOOT :
Denise Ferreira da Silva & Arjuna Neuman @ CCA
by Johnny Rodger

Can climate change be discussed in isolation from racism? From slavery? Can it be discussed in isolation from anything? Johnny Rodger reviews the art work/film by Ferreira da Silva and Neuman commissioned for the Glasgow International Festival.

LEGACY - Issue 68. May - June 2021

 
We’re in an age of great changes -some have happened already and we’re feeling the shift, and we’re on the cusp of some others. What will be the legacy to the future, what have we brought with us from the past and what must we leave behind now?
 
2nd June 2021

Mining the Moral Economy:
Ewan Gibbs on Coal and Deindustrialisation
by Johnny Rodger

Ewan Gibbs' book 'Coal Country' claims to be the first full length study of deindustrialisation in the Scottish coalfields. But its scope is actually much broader and much more ambitious in its treatment of an age of massive social upheaval. Johnny Rodger reviews and appreciates that ambition.
2nd June 2021

Election 2021 and its Legacy
by Owen Dudley Edwards

The analysis of the political landscape of Scotland post-election 2021 that it's been worth waiting for. Owen Dudley Edwards looks at the results and the likely legacies, and puts them in the context of such a deep time and broad space as you won't be able to read elsewhere. It's a reading which is considered and generous in its appreciations, even if forthright in its partisanship.
26th May 2021

‘Yeah! Yeah! (Post) Industrial ESTATE!’
-Jimmy Cauty In Transit
by Neil Cooper

Comic Pranksters or Guerilla Interventionists? Why would anyone from a Scheme (or an ESTATE as they pump it up down there) scheme to burn a million quid? Neil Cooper lets loose on Jimmy Cauty's installation ESTATE and all the music and art and film around it which is coming your way...
19th May 2021

Neighbouring in Deep Time:
Ilana Halperin in Yamaguchi
by Naoko Mabon

In advance of our own Neighbouring project (15-18 June @ GI), one of our Scottish Japanese collaborators, Naoko Mabon, writes here of the work of Scottish artist Ilana Halperin in Japan. Halperin's mineral investigations open us up to the urgency of our understanding of and identity with the geological in the age of Anthropocene.
11th May 2021

The Greenock Industrial and the Greenock Pastoral in ‘Just A Boys’ Game’ and ‘The Elephants’ Graveyard’
by David Archibald

On 17th May the British Film Institute (BFI) released a 3 Disc Blu-ray box set to celebrate fifty years since the first transmission of the BBC's 'Play for Today'. David Archibald has written an accompanying essay for the two Peter McDougall plays which appear in volume 2 of the set. Archibald's piece is a retrospective on a way of life and the art it produced -in special arrangement with the BFI we bring the essay to The Drouth readers' attention.
9th May 2021

Locating Practice / Locating Legacy :
Nicky Bird at Streetlevel
by Eszter Biró

Photographer Nicky Bird's engagement with memory, community, place and legacy is put in artistic and intellectual context by Eszter Biró in a review of Bird's new show at Streetlevel Gallery (until 6th June).

FRONTIER - Issue 67. February - April 2021

 
Frontier is the edgiest of terms -apt for our days. It is indeed a terminus, but also a new beginning again. A line, a mark - ‘the marches’ - a liminal place. Like ‘border’ it calls a halt and keeps out - its consistency, the how and the why of its exclusionary practice probably account for its proliferation of names. But isn’t frontier also specifically a pushing forward of the limits, an advance to embrace the other… isn’t it?
 
24th April 2021

Borders in Borderland:
Scottish frontiers as makers and markers of national and urban identity
by Giovanna Guidicini

What would the introduction of control on the border between Scotland and England mean for those two jurisdictions? What would a politically independent Scotland's controlled borders mean for its relations with the rest of Europe? Giovanna Guidicini looks at the history of the frontier which set Scotland apart and marked out its national territorial integrity. How and why did it come about, and what were the Scots' and outsiders' reaction to it.
17th April 2021

Scotland: Lessons for an Electorate
by Owen Dudley Edwards

The fever is high, but public engagement seems, as yet to lag... Scottish politics is running a factionalist temperature from the 'Manky Jaiket' so-called greens to the Alba blues. New parties have appeared suddenly in the fray and schisms, nastiness, invective, small hatreds and big ugly prejudices seem the order of the day. Owen Dudley Edwards attempts a dispassionate round-up, and counsels an end to self-harm.
9th April 2021

When ye goooooooo … will ye throwback..? by Lorna Miller

Lorna Miller’s incisive work for The Drouth here brilliantly demonstrates how the lightning-fast flare of phantasmagorical developments in Scottish politics at the minute can only be truly grasped and conceived of in its bizarre momentum through a visual medium.
26th March 2021

Unhappy the Land in Need of ‘Heroic’ Men
by
David Archibald

THIS IS NOT AN ALLEGORY -A charismatic male political leader who gathers his support around his powerful personality, is revealed as a dodgy bully, who uses his power to prey sexually on women, is taken to court -nay takes the whole nation to court himself -twice!- is publicly disgraced, but sets himself up in a show at the Edinburgh Fringe, and in Russian media, sets up his own new political party, full of sycophantic followers ... and ... WE MAKE NO EXCUSES FOR REPUBLISHING THIS REVIEW FROM SEVERAL YEARS AGO (from New Left Project 2012) - will we never learn ? It's enough to make us recommend never voting for a man to lead your country ...
12th March 2021

The Irish Frontier
by
Owen Dudley Edwards

Expansive and exclusive is the paradoxical mentality of the frontier from Trump's Wall to Offa's Dyke. Can anybody live on a non-existent border, and how have they done it? Owen Dudley Edwards looks deep into a line of no breadth
23rd February 2021

‘Ní Rabhas ach Seal/ It was only a Matter of Time’ by Noah Rose

What, if anything, does the end of land, or of territory, have to do with the end of language? Is there ever an end of language, even of a particular speaking? Noah Rose is an artist working on the intersection between place and minority language.

CIVIC - Issue 66. December - February 20/21

 
How fares the civic spirit in the bellicose brayings of Brexit? Beyond that ‘local’ difficulty however, we might wonder how meaningful remains the notion of the civic realm in the age of globalisation and the mega-city? Has it been rendered obsolete by new demographic and technological realities? It seems somewhat ironic that action against the global pandemic has arguably been mobilized more effectively at a civic level, but will that have enduring political and moral effects?
 
6th November 2021

Glasgow, Clydeside’s Carbon Capital
by Ewan Gibbs

Was the Second City of Empire the First City of the carbon economy? Ewan Gibbs takes a tour through history and across civic space to show us the special sites of interest in 'Glasgow's role in the making of a fossil burning world'
26th October 2021

Underneath the Arches :
building the foundations to fail better
by Neil Cooper

The loss of The Arches as a site for the eruption of anarchic creative collaborations of a generation through all forms imaginable was a shock. Did the forces of conservatism conspire to finish it off in 2015... or maybe its work was done there, and the spirit needed to move on anyway? Neil Cooper's review of Innes and Bratchpiece's history of the venue is epic and elegaic: it deserves all that and even more ...
26th January 2021

The Uncanny City
by
Pippa Goldschmidt

What happens when a cataclysm brings about the loss of a city's populations and of its historic buildings and neighbourhoods? Can they be rebuilt in reality, or refound in fragments of memory, in art, in history, in literature in documentation? There is something strangely unsettling about reproductions of historical realities, and the relationship of disappeared history to current day realities. Pippa Goldschmidt examines the case with the help of Freud's notion of the Uncanny.
14th January 2021

All you need to know :
Election and Insurrection in the USA
by Owen Dudley Edwards

January 6th, Epiphany in the Christian calendar, is most commonly marked here by the taking down of the pagan midwinter decorations. This year, on the day that gifts were brought from the east for the baby Jesus, some strange kings and magicians visited the home of the American Republic. Owen Dudley Edwards tells us all we need to know, and more, about that 2020 election, and then, the Epiphany at the Capitol.
8th January 2021

Alien of Extraordinary Ability
by
Gavin Mottram

Walls are being built, straits policed, high seas patrolled: in the frantic seeking after sovereignty the stranger is become a foreigner and foreigners are recast as aliens ... Storm the ramparts of the Capitol then, and ask not what we have done to them, but what they could possibly do for us? Gavin Mottram attempts to make an intervention...
2nd January 2021

Feminism and Film: A Dialogue
by Núria Araüna Baro and David Archibald

An epistolary transliteration of a performative dialogue on the possibility of building a non-fiction cinema for the memory of women (as political subjects) – and the role of male academics in that process. Originally presented at Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Catalunya by Núria Araüna Baro and David Archibald.

Room

Issue 65: September-October 2020
 
Room. A space, an aspiration, a void, a container. How do we find our place in the world? Do we accommodate, or carve it out - and at what cost? Simple questions with answers that are anything but binary.
 
16th November 2020

A Balkan Journey by John McDougall

The tragedy in Sarajevo was a lesson for the people of every country, nation, land, city. The Balkans have been a crucible for the question of European peace and unity in the midst of ethnic and political struggle for centuries...
9th November 2020

Spitfire Britain and the Zombie Union by Scott Hames

Can the kingdom still be united if there’s no unionism in the union? And was ‘Unionism’ simply the most charming and esoteric of checks and balances on the ‘union’? It may all seem abstruse now, but Scott Hames sees us hurtling through an absurdly persistent pragmaticism towards a constitutional car crash.
27th October 2020

A Sanctuary for Furies
by Tor Scott

Historically the marginal realm of the feminine, the home for women artists was not always the mere prison of patriarchy. Tor Scott introduces the surrealist women who rendered the domestic sphere as visionary spaces for alchemy and transformation.
6th October 2020

John Latham’s
Niddrie Woman
by Murdo Macdonald

John Latham's 'Niddrie Woman' : former shale bings, a massive piece of land art, a nature reserve, a monument to the achievements and sufferings of the people and the territory of the industrial revolution. A documentation by Murdo Macdonald.
20th September 2020

THERE/NOT THERE
Batman, and other Unilateral Americans
by Mitch Miller

As conservative interests look set to capture its Supreme Court, cities convulse in class and racial conflict and the skies burn along the west coast, the American horizon has never looked darker. Should we Seek an American hero to save US? According to Tom King’s recent take on the the ever-popular Batman, probably best if we didn’t.

Hollow

Issue 64: July-September 2020
 
As successive crises shake every political, social and economic structure, how can a species mired in mutually hostile echo chambers unite, collaborate and act? As common ground crumbles and our foundations built with the effluent of rancid systems and buried sins implode we ask - is the Hollow that is waiting for us a desolation... or an opportunity?
 
28th August 2020

PLAGUE
Albert Camus’ La Peste (1947)
by Owen Dudley Edwards

Clarity on the plague -on all plagues upon us! Owen Dudley Edwards reads the words of 'La Peste', looks at the history, and judges this as medical fiction, which might help our honesty with medical facts.
21st August 2020

A Monumental Servitude: reflections on the objects of the capitalist city
by Hussein Mitha

Abolish restaurants, statues, bars, mirrors and painting -the lot? The bourgeois desire to be served is inescapable in our urban contexts which consolidated in the 19th century city - the ideological hothouse of capitalist modernity. Hussein Mitha reflects on the glut of materials crowding the urban consumer.
14th August 2020

The Hollow Victory over Losers
by Johnny Rodger

Walter Benjamin's work is said to have much influence over contemporary thought. What has been the quality of that influence? And what could he possibly have to say about current winners and losers? Johnny Rodger looks at Benjamin in the context of some more recent work by Ahmed, Butler, Preciado and others.
7th August 2020

The map is not to blame
by Marlies Vermeulen and Remy Kroese (Dear Hunter)

Dear Hunter are designers, map makers and ‘cartopologists’ who engage with the supposedly empty spaces of borderlands, ex industrial landscapes and wherever their blend of art, architecture and anthropology is most needed. Reaching into both past and future, their distinctive practice shows how the map is never more powerful or effective than when treated as a verb.
24th July 2020

Agatha Christie’s ‘The Hollow’
by Owen Dudley Edwards

Agatha Christie wrote The Hollow at the height of her powers, writes Owen Dudley Edwards. Some rich digging through this novel and across all her writing reveals a Christie continually working through the disappointment, heartbreak and suffering of her personal life via the cute and beguiling morals of the whodunnit.
16th July 2020

Metaphor as Parasite:
on ecologies of love, language and disease
by Daisy Lafarge

Too complex to be just romance, too full of personal feeling to be only philosophy, Daisy Lafarge’s Metaphor is a peerlessly accomplished take on love in literary and biological history, gripped with a social scientist’s certainty and the passion of a votary. As an extract from a longer work-in-progress, Lovebug, due to be published in the near future, it was written prior to the global pandemic, so was not intended as a comment or an analysis on current events and all resonance therewith, happy or otherwise, is entirely fortuitous.

Bond

Issue 63: Mar – June. 2020
 
Bonds are being shaken up, loosened, broken off – but not just in the way the Marxists and the Noble Savages imagine… Bonds between individuals and their fellows, between populations and their territory, between human beings and institutions, between folk and their habits, between sensibilities and bodies, between government and citizens… The virus is not by any means the sole cause or instigator of these great changes, the form of our bonds is changing necessarily, and it’s not clear in whose, or what grip we remain.
 
7th June 2020

On Peoples’ Palaces
by Hailey Maxwell

Having quietly endured almost twenty years of managed decline, writes Hailey Maxwell, it is crucial that we consider the possibility that the Peoples’ Palace on Glasgow Green – a valuable civic asset and monument to Scottish history and working-class life may presently be at real risk of being neutralised, misappropriated and entirely co-opted into a neoliberal agenda. Spaces and places which were once public are being repurposed and reimagined not for the benefit of the citizen but for the property developer, the multi-national corporation and the tourist.
29th May 2020

Recovering Reality: Fact-Checking the Traveller… (tether your scapegoat here…)
by Candace G. Thomas

In part two of her extended essay on the prejudices and stigma still faced by contemporary Travellers, Candace Thomas challenges the callousness both casual - and causal - of media and policy makers in a way very recently, proven to rattle those in power: checking the facts and recovering reality.
15th May 2020

Objective Events: Ian Hamilton Finlay, the Arts Councils, and the Battle as art and work.
by Greg Thomas

Artist and poet Ian Hamilton Finlay (1925-2006) was a man of many contradictions: a writer of words and a conceiver of objects, a collaborator and a fighter. Acutely conscious of the presence of history, he was witty and urbane, yet lived in rural isolation, making a barren Scots hillside into a garden and invoking his revolutionary heroes there. Greg Thomas examines his performative relations with the functionaries of the art world, and assesses the ethical worth and creative achievements Finlay worked into those bureaucratic processes apparently so devoid of artistic potential.
9th May 2020

Traveller crime – or a crime to Travellers?
by Candace G. Thomas

It's a story very familiar to anyone from a Traveller culture; with depressing familiarity sections of the British media dust off every shopsoiled prejudice and trope to demonise a culture already far off on the margins. But as researcher and activist Candace Thomas explains, Travellers are no longer inclined to suffer in silence.
1st May 2020

NO ALTERNATIVE or NEVER THE SAME AGAIN?
by Johnny Rodger

Some apparent tendencies and possibilities in political thinking have already emerged in the pandemic situation –as seen by current commentators in blogs, opinion columns etc – can they be viewed a broader political and historical context yet?
24th April 2020

BOND: JSFMBOE, FOHMBOE and TDPUMBOE
by Owen Dudley Edwards

Perpetrating an aura of unreality may be useful, writes Owen Dudley Edwards, in conceiving of the bonds that have connected and codified these island nations... Jsfmboe, Fohmboe and Tdpumboe...
18th April 2020

A Pandemic, Conflict and Options for Justice for Victims of the Syrian Conflict
by Shannon Maree Torrens

In the teeth of the Coronavirus pandemic, politicians and pundits insist that ‘we’re all in it together’. Yet as deaths climb, it is all too clear that equality in infection does not translate to equality in recovery. In this clear-eyed report by Human Rights researcher and advocate Shannon Torrens, we look to Syria, where this dynamic is set to play out on a truly awful scale.
26th March 2020

Undertow by Frances Scott

If photography is the temporal art of the gaze, what is its condition at the edge, or the limit of space? What bonds, what risk of naming can secure it from being drawn off in the 'undertow'? Frances Scott walks the native territory.

Will

Issue 62: Jan. – Mar. 2020
 
Should we be worried about ‘Will’ and its manipulations? – ‘the settled will of the people’? The notion of will is inextricably connected to the operations of power, control, intention, desire, instigation and determination… In the age of Modi, Trump, Salvini and Brexit with their influence throughout the media, with all their manipulations into our personal and social lives, it must be time to examine what is ‘will’ and how does it work?
 
21st March 2020

The Future of Notre Dame in Paris
by Clarisse Godard Desmarest

The tragic slowness of our reaction to the coronavirus and the putting of systematic safety measures in place has contrasted with the relatively swift and mature reaction of the French (and other nations) to this emergency. But is it a sign of a wider conservative and sclerotic inability to act that has taken hold of our society? How could we measure these things? Clarisse Godard Desmarest sets the ball rolling with a description of the terrible fires at both Notre Dame in Paris and Glasgow School of Art, and the reaction of the authorities in each case.
2nd March 2020

A Contest of Will : Who wrote Shakespeare? Queen Victoria, Aurelia’s Aunt, Mr Welbecker or Malvolio?
by Owen Dudley Edwards

Taking inspiration from James Shapiro’s Contested Will Owen Dudley Edwards takes a wry look at the absurdist snobbery and the sheer daftness of the ‘who really wrote Shakespeare?’ tradition.
20th February 2020

Aesthetics, Technological Politics and the Video Age
by Ravi Sundaram

In an age of surveillance capitalism is it no longer viable to put hope in the creative possibilities Walter Benjamin believed were opened to humanity through technological advances in media? –Or can a new poetics of infrastructure disrupt the sinister operations of corporate power? Ravi Sundaram surveys the will in the media.
13th February 2020

Confessions of a Thug: Pakiveli

The hybridiser needs history as a pantry of costumes, wrote Nietzsche, that hymnographer of the Will. What is artist Hardeep Pandhal cooking up for us at The Tramway?
6th February 2020

Beethoven 250
by Iain Matheson

It’s a quarter millennium this year since the birth of THE Romantic hero, the Thunderer himself, Beethoven, who claimed to have taken ‘fate by the throat’ and would never ‘let it bend me completely to its will’. Iain Matheson picks his way through Beethoven’s will and his work.
31st January 2020

Does the estate have its own will? Dwelling upon the last will.
by Agnieszka Kilian

In a world proliferating in riches and injustice there seems, for the moment anyhow, little relief in the notion of generations. For Nietzsche the contract was a ‘memory of the will’, but there are other modes of control of future distribution of goods. The question here, for Agnieszka Kilian, with the last will, is who or what bequeaths, and what actually is the bequest?

Federation

Issue 61: Nov. 2019 – Jan. 2020
 
On the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, we launched our new The Drouth online platform with the first ten-week theme ‘Federation’. In a world where a majority in England wanted to leave the European Union, where there are questions concerning federations, unions and subsidiarity in Scotland, Catalonia, Kashmir, where the US President wants to build a wall between his country and Mexico and where the Israelis already built one to contain the Palestinians, our artists, activists and writers, including those on Los Angeles, India, Scotland, ex-Soviet Union/Russia/Lithuania, Colombia and Brazil, Ireland and UK, take a long look at union, federation, separation, distinction and segregation.
 
19th December 2019

Back to the Individual Experience: Rethinking Chinese Art, Overturning EuroCentrism by Carol Yinghua Lu

A pivotal figure in the intellectual and critical examination of Chinese Art, Carol Yinghua Lu writes about her research which reveals the complex sources, influences traditions and narratives which look […]
13th December 2019

Federalism – A Drouth Enquiry by Owen Dudley Edwards

It seems appropriate to publish a long meditation on the nature and history of federalism on the day of a British election where Brexit is the pressing issue and the […]
4th December 2019

Take the High Road: Scott Hames’ Literary Politics of Scottish Devolution by Colin Kidd

Colin Kidd muses on relations (if any) between the near unanimity of the literary world and the actually existing historical world in his review of Scott Hames’s new book The Literary Politics […]
27th November 2019

The Pro-test Lab – by Nomeda & Gediminas Urbonas

When Marc Augé wrote in The Future that ‘Every protest is a form of research’ he could have been describing the artwork(s) / protest / civil disobedience / celebration / sit-in that was […]
21st November 2019

Humanitarian Crisis, Dignity and Hope on the Río Atrato – Allan Gillies

On the impact of illegal gold mining in Colombia and how communities in Chocó are preserving hope and dignity in the face of a humanitarian crisis.
11th November 2019

‘Dangerously open’ – Los Angeles and the (Grass)roots of segregation – Andrea Gibbons

The principle of self-government of provinces is at the heart of the concept of 'Federation', and ‘The grassroots’ is for many, an inherently leftist, liberal construct. Yet as Andrea Gibbons shows, the white supremacists who shaped the growth of Los Angeles force us to reassess out assumptions over the innate virtues of ‘participation’ .